“At industry conferences, he is constantly asked how to bring “diversity” to public-radio listenership. He’s getting sick of this question. “This is what you do,” he told me. “You hire the people you’re trying to reach.””

Was Miss Utah even that wrong?

Everyone talked about it for days. But was she even that wrong — lacking in eloquence, sure — but content? I’m not so sure she was off the mark. Also, that question was worded a little funky since the entire first half is unnecessary to answering the inequality question:

"A recent report shows that in 40 percent of American families with children, women are the primary earners, yet they continue to earn less than men. What does this say about society? 

And her reply: 

"How to create jobs right now, that is the biggest problem right now, and I think especially the men are seen as leaders of this and so we need to figure out how to create education better so we can solve the problem." 

Yes, men are seen as the leaders of this. It’s a job industry created by men that favors men, giving little consideration to the natural impediments that arise in a woman’s life that hinder her from pursuing the same kind of career growth as men. When a woman has kids, she has to make choices - Should I quit my job? Should I start working part-time? If I work full-time whose going to take care of the kids?

At the end of the day, women just don’t make it as far in many fields as men,  and thus earn nowhere the same amount as men. The current American workplace (in general), lacks the childcare support and understanding necessary to allow more women to take care of the children and also move forward in their careers. 

Maybe job creation isn’t necessarily the solution, but education could be. The kind of ideas about what a woman should be and what a man should be start young. What we need is an education that is less geared towards projecting a certain gender hierarchy in the classroom. Perhaps then, we can better foster a community where women don’t necessarily have to be the primary childcare provider and the workplace is more “family-friendly” in that there will be more childcare services within the workplace itself.

Therefore, like Miss Utah said, education is key. Don’t worry girl, I got you. 

image

 

hikarinagasaki:

Drew this on the plane for fun. A tropical version of the Giving Tree. 


My talented friend, Kari.  hikarinagasaki:

Drew this on the plane for fun. A tropical version of the Giving Tree. 


My talented friend, Kari.  hikarinagasaki:

Drew this on the plane for fun. A tropical version of the Giving Tree. 


My talented friend, Kari. 

hikarinagasaki:

Drew this on the plane for fun. A tropical version of the Giving Tree

My talented friend, Kari. 

“Geometries” exhibits more than meets the eye

(Homage to Squares) 

 

The Davis Museum is presenting “Josef Albers: Geometries” from Tuesday, Feb. 26 through Sunday, June 30, displaying a select number of pieces by the influential teacher, painter, writer and color theorist Josef Albers. Albers, who studied at the prestigious Weimar Bauhaus in the early 20s, produced numerous pieces of influential artwork during his lifetime that represent a transition from the more conventional European art influences of the 20th century to the new, American art movement that was taking place across the Atlantic. Curated by Lisa Fischman and Ruth Shapiro, “Geometries” gives viewers a taste of modernity that remains relevant today.


“Josef Albers: Geometries” sits atop the Davis’s first flight of stairs. Displayed next to the antiquities of the “Festina Letina” exhibit, “Geometries” sharply contrasts the antique vases and relief portraits in the neighboring exhibit with Albers’s distinctively abstract prints and drawings.


Arranged chronologically by date of production against a single wall, the Davis’s “Geometries” collection is largely made up of prints with simple color schemes and sharp, triangular lines. Albers’s mastery of a variety of mediums is apparent even with such a small collection, as his work ranges from embossed prints, to ink drawings and screen prints. Each work challenges viewers to interpret what constitutes a shape as well as where the boundaries lie between overlapping shapes and lines.


(Image of the exhibit itself) 

 

There is an architectural quality to many of Albers’s pieces and several of them, including “Transformation of a Scheme No. 27,” an engraving on black vinylite, have shapes that look like the scaffolding of an unfinished building turned to the side. The wooden color that shines through the vinylite in “Transformation of a Scheme No. 27” reinforces this association.


Furthermore, the way Albers draws or constructs his prints creates the appearance of large shapes composed of intersecting planes moving from different directions. This produces more than just a three-dimensional quality to Albers’s works because it becomes difficult to tell where each plane within the work begins and ends, similar to an M.C. Escher drawing. This leaves viewers to interpret for themselves the boundaries various shapes present within the work. “Contra,” a work produced on linocut and the first work in the “Geometries” chronology at the Davis, was produced in black and white only; however, its simple colors and sharp, angular lines accentuate the fact that the piece has the appearance of various planes intersecting at the center from multiple directions outside the work itself.


The opaque colors of two works from Albers’s “Homage to a Square” series displayed at the Davis collection are fresh despite their light, airy quality, perhaps because they are in the midst of a relatively monochromatic exhibit. Both present viewers with three or four squares of color that seemingly overlap on top of another, with the squares becoming increasingly smaller towards the center of the prints. The way in which Albers paired colors next to each other produces the illusion that the squares are melting into each other whereas in reality they are composed of distinctly colored squares. Demonstrating Albers’s roots as a color theorist, “Homage to a Square” shows how the interaction between certain colors can be deceiving. It’s a shame that this particular Davis collection does not have more works from Albers’s “Homage to a Square” series because it would have been interesting to compare how various color combinations can create the same effect.


The simple colors and linear techniques used by Albers would seem to create works that are only mechanical and distant from viewers. However, the complexity of lines and shapes actually draws viewers into each piece. Albers’s intersecting planes, color usage and strange, often warped shapes beg viewers to continue looking and contemplate the real meaning of shape. His works also make visitors to this exhibit realize the subtleties of what various color combinations can accomplish.


In this way, Albers’s pieces portray that there is more to modern, abstract art than just “simplicity.” Instead, there needs to be a factor that draws viewers in, giving viewers the chance to interpret the work and and providing a deepness that is inherent in the piece without viewers having to read a book or pamphlet about the exhibit to realize it.


From The Washington Post- “At a House Judiciary Committee meeting on Wednesday, Rep. Trent Franks (R-Ariz.), whose measure banning abortions after 20 weeks was being considered by the committee, argued against a Democratic amendment to make exceptions for rape and incest. Franks suggested that pregnancy from rape is rare, saying, “before, when my friends on the left side of the aisle here tried to make rape and incest the subject — because, you know, the incidence of rape resulting in pregnancy are very low.” 
(WHAT?!) 

From The Washington Post- “At a House Judiciary Committee meeting on Wednesday, Rep. Trent Franks (R-Ariz.), whose measure banning abortions after 20 weeks was being considered by the committee, argued against a Democratic amendment to make exceptions for rape and incest. Franks suggested that pregnancy from rape is rare, saying, “before, when my friends on the left side of the aisle here tried to make rape and incest the subject — because, you know, the incidence of rape resulting in pregnancy are very low.”

(WHAT?!) 

Good luck weaning yourself from the cigs Gena, as Russia commits to a comprehensive smoking ban. I thought Time’s look at similar bans across the world was smart, although I think that hardly tells us what will come out of the ban in Russia. In Boston at least, such measures in combination with the tobacco cessation programs drastically decreased tobacco usage. Therefore, I wonder if there needs to be a parallel emphasis on cessation programs that can help people kick their habit. 

When Teamsters Local 25 mobilized against the Westboro Baptist Church last month, the group used Twitter and Facebook to summon help from their members and supporters. The subsequent 500 person assembly at Krystle Campbell’s Medford funeral, which the WBC had threatened to picket, seemed to show social media’s power as a local rallying tool. This Boston area case further bolstered an existing sense that social media is the new impetus for mass movements—as demonstrated in countries like Tunisia and Egypt during the Arab Spring.

What should we think, then, of the many protests each year that are much less successful despite their organizers’ use of social media platforms?

That moment when your professor simply crosses off an entire line and writes “disaster” over it. It’s great to be a senior

(May issue of Boston Magazine)

Imagine how many interns it took to send all these shoes back to the runners. How many you ask? Three.

It’s an amazing cover, so amazing in fact, that a spare copy of the May issue of Boston Magazine cannot be found in the office. I have to resort to going to the nearest Whole Foods to BUY a copy. 

Let me also just say that I especially like the barefoot running shoes at the center. That was a nice touch.